Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology

Resources

Further information

Histology

  • Lieca Cryostat
  • Lieca Microtome
  • Ultra Microtome
  • Tissue Processor
  • Tissue Embeder
  • Lynx EM Processor
  • Knife Sharpener
  • Various stains

Imaging

  • Leica Upright DM RB/E
  • Nikon Inverted TE300
  • Live cell imaging suit
  • Open and closed heating chambers
  • Low-light cameras
  • High-resolution and video bright-light cameras
  • Routin upright fluorescence microscope
  • Stereoscopic
  • Dissecting
  • Microscopes

Analysis

  • Stereo Investigator
  • Neurolucia
  • MetaMorph
  • Image Pro Plus
  • V++

As well as a range of state-of-the-art facilities, CELLCentral offers training and the use of our equipment.

Leica upright microscope

The LEICA DM RB/E is a powerful research microscope with infinity optics well-suited for biological applications. It has a modular design, allowing for individual requirements.

The Leica has a motorised XYZ with coded objective nosepiece, interchangeable condensers and tubes, optional Bertrand lens and magnification changer.

Optics Supported: Bight light, Phase, Nomarski or Fluorescence.

Fluorescence cubes

  • Cube A: UV - Excitation BP 340 - 380, Emission LP 425
  • Cube D: UV + Violet - Excitation BP 355 - 425, Emission LP 470
  • Cube I3: Blue light - Excitation BP 450 - 490, Emission LP 515
  • Cube I5: Blue light - Excitation BP 480/40, Emission BP 527/30
  • Cube N2.1: Green light - Excitation BP 515 - 560, Emission LP 590
  • Cube N3: Green light - Excitation BP 546/12, Emission BP 600/40.

Dual cubes

  • Cube XF53: Recommended for: FITC/TEXAS RED
  • Excitation 490 - 577, Emission 520 - 580
  • Cube XF52: Recommended for: FITC/TRITC, Cye3/Cye2
  • Excitation 496 - 550, Emission 520 - 580.

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Nikon TE 300 microscope

The Nikon TE 300 is an inverted research microscope with infinity optics well-suited for biological applications. It has a modular design, allowing for individual requirements. The Nikon has interchangeable condensers and tubes, optional Bertrand lens and magnification changer. It also includes a motorised xyz stage that is fully controlled by software (Metamorph).

The Nikon TE 300 is fully equipped for imaging live cells and has two interfacing automated shutters (for bright and florecsent light), heated chambers, video cameras and an editing suite.

Supported Optics: Phase, Nomarski, Hoffman or Fluorescence.

Fluorescence Cubes

  • Cube A: UV - Excitation BP 340 - 380, Emission LP 425
  • Cube I3: Blue light - Excitation BP 450 - 490, Emission LP 515
  • Cube N2.1: Green light - Excitation BP 515 - 560, Emission LP 590.

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Live imaging suite

Our state-of-the-art live cell imaging suit is capable of imaging dynamic events of living cells over long or short time periods.

It includes the Nikon inverted microscope, fluorescence and bright-light shutters, motorised XYZ, specialised software (Metamorph and Adobe Premier) open and closed heated chambers, peristaltic pump, editing and capturing suit.

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Heated chambers

Bioptechs open and closed chambers are used for long and short-term monitoring of cells in culture, providing up to one week of continuous monitoring. We also have a perfusion pump that allows us to pump fresh media (with or without CO2) to the chambers.

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Low-light cameras

  • The CoolSNAP ES Monochrome camera from Roper Scientific is a fast, high-resolution digital system designed for low-light scientific and industrial applications. It is a moderately cooled CCD camera that provides 12-bit digitisation at 20 MHz. Megapixel resolution, small pixel and long exposures allow imaging of fine details.
  • The Dage MTI A cooled CCD and fast low-light video camera is perfect for routine work and low-light live cell imaging.

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Bright-light cameras

  • Nikon DXM1200F: A 12,000 Megapixels CCD camera, perfect for bright-light imaging and publication quality images.
  • Hitachi 3 chip CCD: A video CCD camera perfect for routine work, capturing of composite images and bright-light live cell imaging.

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